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There’s no pumpkin in “100% canned pumpkin”

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Pumpkin is too watery and stringy to can, and the USDA has an exceptionally loosey-goosey definition of "pumpkin," which allows manufacturers to can various winter squash varieties (including one that Libby's specially bred to substitute for pumpkin) and call it "100% pumpkin." (more…)

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denismm
15 hours ago
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False. http://www.snopes.com/canned-pumpkin-isnt-actually-pumpkin/
icepotato
10 hours ago
THANK YOU <3
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Mahjong Is Now Available For Xbox One

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Content: Mahjong
Check price and availability in your Xbox LIVE region

Game Description: Play a Zen game! Rediscover the famous traditional Chinese game. Find all the matching pairs of tiles, being careful not to become blocked in, to get to the end of each level. Concentration and perceptiveness are needed to finish the gorgeous boards that we have produced for you. Traditional Mahjong with all its depth and captivating beauty. 70 levels with varying difficulty and brand new puzzles. Customize your games with different graphic styles. Compare scores with your friends and players from around the world.

Purchase Mahjong for Xbox One from the Xbox Games Store

Product Info:
Developer: –
Publisher: Bigben Interactive
Website: Mahjong
Twitter: @BigbenBenelux





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denismm
28 days ago
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Calling this game "Mahjong" is like calling Klondike "Cards". 😡
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DMack
28 days ago
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at last it is available
Victoria, BC

Freefall 2835 July 11, 2016

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Freefall 2835 July 11, 2016
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denismm
78 days ago
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Utterly consistent quality and schedule for 18 years and he says "end of chapter 1"?
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Why Do Pirates Wear Earrings?

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article-image

Can that earring pay for his funeral? (Photo: David Goehring/CC BY 2.0)

Avast! Can any one of you scurvy dogs tell me if this earring matches this bandana? While pirates have a reputation for crime and cruelty, they are also known to be flamboyant dressers, if most depictions in popular culture can be believed. And there's one essential accessory sported by everyone from Jack Sparrow to Captain Morgan: the gold hoop earring. 

When exactly men of the sea began to put rings in their ears is anyone’s guess, but there are a handful of legends that claim to explain the fashion. The most popular myth behind the jewelry trend is that sailors would wear gold and silver earrings so that no matter where they died, they would be adorned with a way to pay for their burial. Since gold and silver were accepted forms of payment just about everywhere in the world, having a hunk of it stuck in your ear where it won’t wash away at sea was a pretty solid insurance policy. 

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(Photo: Howard Pyle/Public Domain)

There does seem to be some truth to this myth, says pirate historian Gail Selinger. “If you were a pirate or a thief, you were never buried. But if you’re on land and you die, then you have the money for your own burial, “ she says of the earrings. And it wasn’t just earrings that pirates wore to show off their wealth. During the golden age of piracy, pirates were known to drill holes in coins and wear them like necklaces and bracelets. “They’d wear it on their wrist, or around their neck, so that no one could steal their purse. [Archeologists] found quite a few of those [pieces of money jewelry]. So it’s not just a myth,” says Selinger. How widespread the practice was, however, is unknown.

In addition to their possible role as a down payment on a burial, earrings and jewelry were objects of rebellion. During the height of piracy in the 17th and 18th centuries, much of Europe, and especially England, had a number of sumptuary laws in place that regulated what the common people could wear and how they could live. “It was a legal way for the ruling class to separate themselves from commoners, by regulating what they wore, what they could drink, where they could live,” says Selinger.

The stifling laws prescribed things down to what colors people could wear, what genders could sport jewelry—men weren't allowed—and where they could show off the approved things they could afford. Those who refused to obey these laws could face jail time or heavy monetary fines. Unsurprisingly, this culture of control didn’t really gel with the freewheeling lives of pirates. “Pirates basically gave [these laws] a, ‘to hell with you!’ The mindset was, ‘I no longer allow you to tell me what I can and cannot do,’” says Selinger.    

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(Photo: Howard Pyle/Public Domain)

According to Selinger, the flamboyant dress that came to be associated with historic pirates was a direct response to these sumptuary laws. “Especially going into town, they would wear clothes that they had stolen or purchased in the town, and then wear them, essentially saying, ‘Here I am, what’re you gonna do about it?’ So, the earrings represented [flouting]  flaunting these laws.”

However, without a great deal of concrete evidence of what pirates actually wore, and the thinking behind their outfits, not everyone is convinced that pirates’ iconic earrings were ever really a thing. “Pirates didn't really wear earrings at all—or bandanas," says Angus Konstam, author of Pirate: The Golden Age.“Both were the invention of the late 19th-century American artist Howard Pyle. When he was asked to depict pirates for children's books, he based them on drawings he'd made of Spanish peasants and bandits. So, his pirates wore sashes around their waists, headscarves... and earrings.” As Konstam points out, Pyle is often credited with popularizing what is today considered stereotypical pirate dress, and our continued depiction of pirates wearing earrings is likely thanks to his work.

Whether it's a myth based on some truth, or a truth surrounded by myth, swashbuckling seafarer and their earrings are now inextricably linked. Even hundreds of years later, you can't separate a pirate from their treasures. 

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denismm
114 days ago
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Han Solo wore an earring? :)
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DMack
115 days ago
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Harrison Ford played a sort of space pirate in Star Wars, so you could say the tradition began "a long time ago"
Victoria, BC

A Metal Version of John Cage’s “4’33″”

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One of the weirdest avant-garde compositions of all time is John Cage’s 1952 work, “4’33″” (You pronounce it “four minutes and thirty-three seconds.”). Its original form consists of a pianist sitting at the keyboard and…doing nothing for four minutes and thirty-three seconds. Cage’s goal was to get people to listen to the sounds of the [&hellip

The post A Metal Version of John Cage’s “4’33″” appeared first on A Journal of Musical Things.

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denismm
148 days ago
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\m/
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drchuck
148 days ago
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Turn it up.
Long Island, NY
wreichard
148 days ago
Hear that sustain?
fxer
148 days ago
I don't hear anything

Laws of Physics

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The laws of physics are fun to try to understand, but as an organism with incredibly delicate eyes who evolved in a world full of sharp objects, I have an awful lot of trust in biology's calibration of my flinch reflex.
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denismm
160 days ago
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Black Hat is not to be trusted.
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Covarr
160 days ago
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At that distance, he'll get hit regardless.
Moses Lake, WA
alexanglin
160 days ago
It would help if there were more than two dimensions.
Lythimus
160 days ago
When is xk3d launching?
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